Measure precise volume

Tutorial series: Introducing Shapr3D basics

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What you'll learn

Learn the process for calculating volume of a select body. You walkthrough creating a new body from a rectangle placed around the motorcycle gas tank, using the Subtract tool, and working with Design History to keep tool bodies and then calculate the volume of the tank.

Transcript

00:01

Welcome to the tank part 6. This is the final video in the tank series. Here we'll learn exactly the volume of gas needed in the motorcycle's gas tank. That gives us our filler neck and the cap will be a separately designed piece. Now if you want to figure out precisely the volume of this tank, let me show you how to do that. Let's first turn off the hidden edges.

00:29

open a new sketch.

00:33

on this top plane.

00:37

zoom out. I'm just going to make a big rectangle. It's set to a center rectangle, so we'll just go with that. Doesn't really matter. It's got to be bigger than the part, bigger than the tank. Okay.

00:58

I want to extrude this rectangle, so I'm actually going to turn off the body, because the body is going to interfere with this somewhat. And I'll just drag down another solid.

01:14

that should fully encompass the gas tank. And the result here is new body as it should be. We're just going to keep it this way and then turn on the original body. From here, we'll use the tools to subtract. The order of operations here is to select the bodies that you want to remove from, and then...

01:42

select the bodies that you want to remove. Well, the body we want to remove from is the new one that we just created. And the body we want to remove is going to be the gas tank. And this is going to leave us with three options. The gas tank itself, anything outside the gas tank and anything inside the gas tank. Obviously we're only interested in the volume inside the gas tank.

02:11

So we'll say OK on this, we're done. The result has been two bodies, body2 and body2 star. Notice that body3 has gone away and that there is nothing where the tank itself used to be. So we're going to go to the Boolean feature in the history tree. We're going to take a look at the parameters used to create that.

02:40

In this case, it gives us the option to keep the tool bodies. And that's the one that we want to use because the gas tank itself was considered a tool. So now we have our body 1 back and body 2 and 2 star. So we can turn off 2 star, we can turn off body 1, and what's left is the frozen gas in the gas tank. We can take a measurement of body 2.

03:10

That is 736 cubic inches. And if you use your calculator, that's about 3.2 gallons. To get the actual designed tank back, turn off body two and turn on body one. And you're back to just the tank as designed. Thanks for watching and I hope you learned a lot.

 

Try it yourself

Intro-Shapr3D-motorcycle.png
Motorcycle
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-Motorcycle-cover.png
Motorcycle cover
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-piston.png
Piston
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-piston-rod.png
Piston rod
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-rod-clamp.png
Rod clamp
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-Model-4-motorcycle-wheel.png
4 motorcycle wheel
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-frame.png
Frame
Download
Intro-Shapr3D-Model-block-casting.png
Block casting
Download

 

About the instructor

Instructor-Matt-Lombard.png

Matt Lombard is an independent product development professional, working in the field for 30 years. He has done a variety of work from plastics design and surfacing work to writing instructional and reference materials and writing about the engineering technology industry. Matt has also served as CAD Admin, PDM implementor, and engineering process consultant.




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